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The Classics Book Tag

Hello, people of the internet!

As you can probably tell by the title of this post, today I’m going to do the classics book tag. I’m aware that this tag is almost as old as the internet itself, but you know I love classics so, here I am.  
So, let us start!

  • An overhyped classic you really didn’t like.

My answer is a common one, which is Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. This book was far too melodramatic for my liking. Personally, if the plot is more drama intense I need there to be a self-awareness from the characters, which is not the case in this book.  

  • What is your favourite time period to read about?

I have to go with the late 19th century and the yearly 20th century. There is a revolutionary feel in books from that time which I love. 

  • Favourite fairy-tale.

I’m not an avid fairy-tale reader or fan. So, I don’t know. I had a Grimm Brothers’ book when I was younger I liked, does that count? 

  • What is the most embarrassing classic you haven’t read yet?

I have never read a book by Jane Austin, feel free to judge me. I picked up Sense and Sensibility once and just wasn’t feeling it. 

  • Top 5 classics you would like to read (soon).

I do know this one, I have a list:

  1. A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas by Virginia Woolf.
  2. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey.
  3. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath.
  4. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.
  5. And the one I just bought, War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. 
  • Favourite movie version/tv-series based on a classic.

The 1954’s adaptation of Nineteen Eighty-Four by the director Rudolph Cartier. 

  • Worst classic to movie adaptation.

I don’t know. I really don’t like the 2012’s adaptation of Anna Karenina but I highly doubt it’s the worst classic to movie adaptation, it’s just not for me.

  • What is your favourite edition you’d like to collect more classics from?

Easy, Oxford World Classics. They have both a good font and a nice size. Not to mention, the introductions and notes. Love it. 

  • An underhyped classic you’d recommend to everyone.

Easy peasy lemon squeezy! I have to recommend Mother (in the original: Мать) written by Maxim Gorky in 1906. It’s about revolutionary factory workers, as well as the story of the radicalization of an uneducated woman/mother. It’s amazing!

So, that is it. That is all I have for you today, hope you enjoy. Talk to you next time.
Bye, keep on reading!

Why She Wrote: A Graphic History of the Lives, Inspiration, and Influence Behind the Pens of Classic Women Writers – Book Review

First of all, I want to thank Chronicle Books for the ARC.

I found the premise for Why She Wrote by Lauren Burke, Hannah K. Chapman and Kaley Bales to be super interesting, the introduction made me super excited to read the rest of the book and I thought this book was a neat take on a biography.

It’s such a unique idea, and honestly one of the most informative books I’ve ever come across. However, I found the transition from written biography to graphic novel mode was often disorienting. Within the illustrated sections, I found that the script font used was difficult to read and the font used in the rest of the book quite unattractive. The images themselves I liked, they were cute but nothing out of this world.

I found the stories of the women interesting, but the writing of the stories not so much, which is sad. More often than not, I was reading just in hopes to see if the chapter on the next writer/author was any better. 

With that being said, I think this book has a place on a shelf of a child with interest in literature and whose parents/teachers are enlighted enough to want their kid/student to read about the power of female authors. 

To sum up, I ended up liking the concept more than the actual book itself and maybe it was just not that well executed. I think the book has potential but needs significant editing and changes before being published. I think it is also very important to mention that the book is very euro-centric and I think it’s time to stop associating classics exclusively to white authors. 

End of Year Book Survey 2020

**2020 READING STATS**

Number Of Books You Read: 31 (not my best year)
Number of Re-Reads: none
Genre You Read The Most From: Non-fiction, both feminist and anti-Racist literature

Here we go!


  • Best Book You Read In 2020?

It has to be a tie between A Moveable Feast by Hemingway and Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami. I read the first one this month after a reading slump and it really got me back into the mood to read. The other I read during January before were all it by this neverending pandemic and all I can say is that I’m glad it was my first book by Murakami. 

  • Book You Were Excited About & Thought You Were Going To Love More But Didn’t?

For this one I have t go with How to Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran. The concept looked really good but unfortunately, the delivery and writing were not. I can’t tell you if it’s only this book, or if it’s her tone or outlook in general I disliked, the only thing I can say is that it was overall a disappointment. 

  • Favourite new author, you discovered in 2020?

I have to keep with the first answer and say, Murakami and Hemingway. 

  • Most action-packed/thrilling/unputdownable book of the year?

No doubt this title belongs to The Time Machine by H. G. Wells. I was so glad to confirm my love for H. G. Wells’ books. Highly recommend this one to all the sci-fi fans. 

  • Book You Read In 2020 That You Would Be MOST Likely To Re-Read Next Year?

Moby Dick by Herman Melville just because I feel like I need to give it another chance. I feel like if I re-read it, I might actually really like it. 

  • Favourite cover of a book you read in 2020?

Pumpkinheads by Rainbow Rowell and illustrated by Faith Erin Hicks, it’s just so cute. 

  • The most memorable character of 2020?

Nakata from Kafka on the Shore we all need to collectively hug him. 

  • Most beautifully written book read in 2020?

Death with Interruptions (or in the original title: As Intermitências da Morte) by the great, the best, the only José Saramago. We all know I love his writing with all my soul, nothing new. 

  • Most Thought-Provoking/ Life-Changing Book of 2020?

I have to go with Death with Interruptions by Saramago or Women, Race & Class by Angela Y. Davis.

  • Book you can’t believe you waited UNTIL 2020 to finally read? 

Of Love and Other Demons by Gabriel García Márquez. I just needed to read all of his small books first before picking up Hundred Years of Solitude get to know his writing style. 

  • Favourite Passage/Quote From A Book You Read In 2020

This is easy:

“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagements, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.” ― Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

This has to be the most beautiful, most honest paragraph to ever be written. 

  • Shortest & Longest Book You Read In 2020?

The shortest is the essay Fascism and Democracy by George Orwell and the longest is obviously Moby Dick. 

  • Favourite Non-Romantic Relationship Of The Year

I know this one, it has to be Nakata and the truck driver from Kafka on the Shore. Just so sweet and pure, aaaaaah. 

  • Favourite Book You Read in 2020 From An Author You’ve Read Previously

Death with Interruptions by Saramago, my love for his books is the most authentic form of love.

  • Book That Put A Smile On Your Face/Was The Most FUN To Read?

Death with Interruptions by Saramago! It this getting repetitive? 

  • Book That Made You Cry Or Nearly Cry in 2020?

It was a very dry year for me, book crying wise. No triers, whatsoever. 

  • Most Unique Book You Read In 2020?

Poems to Night by Rainer Maria Rilke. Some of the best poetry I have ever read. 

  • Book That Made You The Most Mad (doesn’t necessarily mean you didn’t like it)?

The Suffragettes from the Little Black Classics collection. The part about the anti-suffragette movement was infuriating.


Well, I guess this is it. Let me know if you read any of the books I mentioned and what books fit these questions regarding your reading year.

I what to thank The Perpetual Page Turner for once again sharing with us her Annual End Of Year Survey, please go check out her blog.

Bye, keep on reading.

A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway – Book Review

If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.” – Ernest Hemingway

A Moveable Feast is Ernest Hemingway’s memoir of his time spent in Paris after the war and beginning of his writing career. He was living alongside other writers such as Gertrude Stein, Joyce, Pound, Madox Ford and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

One day, I was roaming around a book shop, as one does, and came across this book. I felt this unspeakable urge to buy this book knowing nothing about it whatsoever. Once I got home and searched it on Goodreads, I saw it had more than four stars I thought to myself: “Nice to know this was not a waste of money”. It sat on my bookshelf for about a year, I picked it put this month and simply could not put it down for a second.

In this book, you read about someone becoming a writer and romanticize about it overlooking the fact that Hemingway describes going hungry somedays so that his wife and child could eat. I loved reading about the friendship between Hemingway and Fitzgerald and getting to see the perception the author had of him as both a person and a writer. It was just so heartwarming.

Every chapter in A Moveable Feast is sort of a little story from his life. You get a varied idea of what he was up to and came to realize that he had kind of a problem with gambling, most likely because he thought it was the only way he had to make money.

I gave this book 5 out of 5 stars and highly recommend it.

“I would stand and look out over the roofs of Paris and think, ‘Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence you know.’ So finally I would write one true sentence, and go on from there.” – Ernest Hemingway

Women, Race & Class by Angela Davis – Book Review

Woman, Race & Class is a non-fiction book about the connection between racism, class prejudice and white feminism.

Having read Angela Davis before (Freedom Is a Constant Struggle) I had already been introduced to the political activist’s narrative. However, this book was a pleasant surprise. Freedom Is a Constant Struggle is a collection of interviews and speeches, so it ended up being a bit repetitive, whereas Woman, Race & Class was objective, concise and exactly what I was hoping from it.

Angela Davis breaks down how misogyny, racism, and classism have shaped our society. She pays special attention to how white-dominated middle-class social movements have repeatedly forsake solidarity with both working class and black people in behalf of political convenience, as well as displaying how the biased goals of white reformists have allowed capitalist oppression throughout history.

This book moved through the atrocities of slavery, lynching and, overall, racist discrimination, especially by the feminist movement of the 20th century. Reading it, I felt outraged and angry towards my very own privileges.

Women, Race & Class is organized in such a way that everything you read sounds like new information even though we know it’s all connected which was exactly the book’s intent. The biggest take from this book is an extremely important one: INTERSECTIONALITY MATTERS, and sometimes we forget how much.

I gave this book 5 out of 5 starts.

Paris, Texas (1984), by Wim Wenders – Film Review

Paris, Texas by Wim Wenders is the story about family and loss. The director uses themes of both brotherly relationships and fatherhood as a metaphor for man’s quest for personal identity, and he does it magically.

The fi out rst time we see Travis he is walking in Terlingua, a barren and dusty region of Texas. He isfilm-paris-texas-263 wearing a filthy suit along with a ragged red baseball cap. A bit into the film Travis reunites with his brother Walt Henderson, we know four years have passed since Walt and his wife Anne took responsibility for raising Travis’s young son Hunter. The story takes on from there.

The cinematography is poetic and there is a visual sense that contextualizes the characters’ feel of looming, present and past loss. Wenders shows us that his storytelling finds truth and poetry in the mundane. The film doesn’t need gimmicks or cliches to escalate emotional reaction from the viewer or create interest. This result is obtained simply by making the characters feel human.

All I can say is after I finished watching this masterpiece I was feeling everything and nothing at the same time. I don’t exactly look for this in a film, but once this feeling comes along, it’s hard to look at the art form in the same way ever again.

It’s a 9 out of 10. Please go and watch it now!

Me and White Supremacy Workbook by Layla F. Saad – Book Review

“I think whites are carefully taught not to recognize white privilege, as males are taught not to recognize male privilege.” – Peggy McIntosh

Me And White Supremacy Workbook by Layla F. Saad is a pioneer, anti-racism book for people holding white privilege to begin examining and dismantling their complicity in the oppressive system of white supremacy.

Far too often, I see white people blaming other white people and declaring them as the problem that causes racism, to distance themselves from the problem. I was happy to see that being addressed in the book.

If like me, you were always taught that racism is bad and that people should all have the same rights and opportunities, this book still serves as an excellent tool for digging out internalized messages regarding race that you might not have been aware of.

The only negative aspect I have to point out is that the book starts with multiple separate chapters about the author when the intent of the book is not to get to know the author but to critically analyse your privilege, which to me felt slightly off.

Needless to say, I have learned a lot. The questions didn’t allow for any hesitation, and I know that, though I have a lot of work to do, I now have basic knowledge on how to continue the work.

I recommend it as a tool for anyone who is or wants to be anti-racism. (and if you don’t want to what are you doing reading this)

I gave this book 4 out of 5 starts.

Given the current social climate, instead of telling you to keep on reading, I’ll provide you with a website which has both petitions and donations for you to take part in. Remember that what is happing right now in the US is not a US problem, there is racism in every country and our responsibility is to take action.

Stay safe and resist the oppression!

Link: https://biglink.to/forBLM

She Represents: 44 Women Who Are Changing Politics . . . and the World, by Caitlin Donohue – Book Review

She represents is a non-fiction title written by Caitlin Donohue. It brings light to 44 powerhouse women around the world.

First of all, I’m glad African and South American women were mentioned, however, in my opinion, the book would have had more impact if the approach had been even more global (more Asian and European women) since it focused mainly on women in the United States. The author gives us a summary of these diverse and interesting women in less than 3 pages per person. Not to mention, I was extremely happy to see a wide range of political ideologies represented.

The background stories come to life as a result of the references to their personalities or personal anecdotes. Those make the woman in power feel more relatable. I found the artwork to be both inviting and full of life (and I believe there might be more artwork to come, given it was only an arc).

I reckon this book would be nice for those seeking to learn more about women in politics, current political circumstances.

Thank you to Caitlin Donohue, Zest Books, and Netgalley for providing me with a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Don’t forget that She Represents releases on September 1, 2020.

I give this book 3.5 out of 5 stars.

The Farewell, by Lulu Wang – Film Review

I’ll start by explaining what this film is about without any spoilers because this film is just too precious. The Farewell was directed by Lulu Wang and follows Billi a young woman who learns that her grandmother is sick and has a very short time left to live. To her surprise, the family decides not to tell her grandmother that she is dying. Instead, they arrange a wedding as an excuse for everyone to go back to China and see her one last time before she passes, almost like saying goodbye without being able to say it!the_farewell_poster

The film is able to approach the subject from both the western and eastern mindsets without diminishing neither of them, which for me was one of the greatest qualities of the story.  The Farewell is packed with complex characters who feel like real people, who have real conversations about topics that really matter. The film maneges to be funny between the sad moments giving it the levity that it needs, not the mention the amazing way in which the family bonds are portrayed.

(SPOILERS AHEAD)

I cried about 5 times during the entire film and one extra time once it ended. I’ll list the scenes that made me cry the most:

  1. When Billi speaks about how hard it was for her to leave China, the impact it had on her to not be able to be around her grandma as much and how painful it was to never be able to see her grandpa again given that her parents never really explained his death to her.
  2. I cried during the wedding part when Billi’s cousin starts to cry and we realize the all “thing” is really taking a toll on him too, even if for him the situation is sposed to be normal.
  3. The one that made me cry the most was when “Nai Nai” is talking to Billi and tells her that when the time comes for her (Billi’s) wedding she will give an even bigger party just because it was for Billi.

I can not end this without mentioning the shot of Billi running as fast as she can in order to get her “Nai Nai” medical results in order to get them before her, I truly loved it and the music for that shot was incredibly used (and in the entire film, overall).

(END OF SPOILERS)

Exactly as I wrote in my notebook after watching The Farewell: “I’m in love with this film, the soundtrack is 100% amazing and exactly what it had to be elevating the film to a whole other level. THANK YOU LULU WANG! This is excellent.”

I gave this film 9 out of 10!

Bye! Gotta watch ’em all!

The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur – Book Review

More than its predecessor, The Sun and Her Flowers discusses an even wider range of topics. This poetry collection discusses sexual assault, gender inequality, racism, feminism and family.35606560._sy475_

With this new collection, Kaur opens up the dialogue to even more important topics, giving emphasis to friendship, to how we treat our planet, greater attention to social stigmas of beauty while giving focus to bonds between mothers and daughters, which made me enjoy this second book by Kaur a lot more. By expanding her topic range, she allowed more people to feel connected not only her work but to other individuals as well. Which means, so many more people can find comfort through the words printed on these pages.

I read The Sun and Her Flowers in one sitting, and while I enjoyed it for the most part, there was a good chunk of poems I just couldn’t connect to. I don’t blame the author, it’s normal given that not everyone feels connected to the same topics.

Just like I stated in my review of Milk and Honey, Kaur writes in an emotive way, not to mention that the metaphors she uses are exceptionally powerful and have the capacity linger on your mind.

I gave this book 4 out of 5 stars. And I truly recommend it if you are into contemporary poetry.

Bye, keep on reading.